$4.5 million in funding from the Australian Brain Cancer Mission through the Medical Research Future Fund

Release Date: 

14/02/2019

News Type: 

  • Announcement

In its inaugural year the Australian Brain Cancer Mission (the Mission) contestable grants round was linked to the 2018 round of the Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF) – Clinical Trials Activity for Rare Cancers, Rare Diseases and Unmet Need grant opportunity. Through this funding opportunity, the Mission was seeking new or expanded innovative clinical trials that could involve international collaborations, to support increased and equitable access and participation in clinical trials for people with brain cancer.

Today, the Minister for Health, the Hon Greg Hunt announced a total of $4.5 million in funding from the Mission through the MRFF and its co-investors Carrie’s Beanies 4 Brain Cancer and the Mark Hughes Foundation.

Funding through the Mission is being awarded to:

  • Dr Jordan Hansford of Monash University, for a clinical trial entitled COZMOS: Phase I/Ib trial of COmbined 5'-aZacitidine and carboplatin for recurrent/refractory paediatric brain and solid tuMOurs
  • Associate Professor Nicholas Gottardo of Monash University, for a clinical trial entitled SJ-ELiOT: St Jude - Phase 1 Evaluation of LY2606368, Molecularly-Targeted CHK1/2i Therapy, in Combination with Cyclophosphamide or Gemcitabine for Children and Adolescents with Refractory or Recurrent Medulloblastoma Brain Tumours
  • Dr Craig Gedye of the University of Sydney, for a clinical trial entitled MAGMA: Multi-Arm GlioblastoMa Australasia Trial
  • Dr Hao-Wen Sim of the University of Sydney, for a clinical trial entitled PICCOG: PARP and Immune Checkpoint inhibitor COmbination for relapsed IDH-mutant high-grade Glioma.

Clinical trials benefit the community by improving the survival of people affected by cancer, and contribute to a reduction in premature death and disability.  Clinical trials are fundamental to establishing whether new cancer  treatments,  diagnostic  tests  or  preventive  interventions  are  effective,  they  help  generate evidence for best-practice cancer care and they provide the opportunity to accelerate the testing of treatments to improve survival outcomes.

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