Liver cancer statistics

For an overview of Liver cancer click here

Incidence

  • In 2010, there were 1,404 new cases of liver cancer in Australia (1,023 new cases in men and 381 new cases in women), accounting for 1.2 per cent of all new cancers.1,2
  • In 2014, about 1,800 Australians (1,220 men and 580 women) are expected to be diagnosed with liver cancer.3
  • In 2020, an estimated 2,465 Australians are expected to be diagnosed with liver cancer.3
  • Liver cancer is more common in men:
    • In 2010, the age-standardised incidence rate of liver cancer in men was 9.1 cases per 100,000 men, compared with 2.9 cases per 100,000 women.1
  • In 2009, the average age of liver cancer diagnosis was 66.6 years.4
  • In 2010, the risk of developing liver cancer before the age of 85 years was 1 in 129.1
  • Between 1982 and 2010, the age-standardised incidence rate for liver cancer increased from 1.8 to 5.9 cases per 100,000 people.1

Mortality

  • In 2011, there were 1,423 deaths from liver cancer (980 men and 443 women), accounting for 3.3 per cent of all cancer deaths in Australia.1,2
  • The age-standardised mortality rate for liver cancer is higher for men:
    • In 2011, there were 8.5 deaths per 100,000 men from liver cancer, compared with 3.3 deaths per 100,000 women.1
  • In 2011, the risk of dying from liver cancer before the age of 85 was 1 in 124.1
  • Between 1982 and 2011, the age-standardised mortality rate for liver cancer increased from 2.3 to 5.8 deaths per 100,000 people.1

Survival

  • Survival rates for liver cancer are low. In recent years, relative survival rates for liver cancer have increased in Australia:
    • Between the periods 1988-1993 and 2006-2010, five-year relative survival increased from 7.0 per cent to 15.5 per cent.5

Prevalence

  • At the end of 2007, it was estimated that there were 2,238 people in Australia who were diagnosed with liver cancer in the previous 26 years, including 1,565 people diagnosed in the previous 5 years.5

Burden of disease

  • Cancer is estimated to be the leading cause of the burden of disease in Australia.4
  • In 2012, liver cancer was estimated to account for 6,800 disability adjusted life years (DALYs*) in Australia; of these, 6,700 were years lost due to premature death and 130 were years of healthy life lost due to disease, disability or injury.4†

*DALYs are years of healthy life lost, either through premature death or through living with disability due to illness or injury. This is the basis unit used in burden of disease or injury estimates.4

Estimates may not add up due to rounding, as indicated in AIHW Cancer in Australia report.

References

  1. Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality (ACIM) Books - Liver cancer for Australia (ICD10 C22). http://www.aihw.gov.au/acim-books/ [Accessed March 2014].
  2. Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality (ACIM) Books – All Cancers combined for Australia (ICD10 C00-C97, D45-46, D47.1, D47.3). http://www.aihw.gov.au/acim-books/   [Accessed March 2014].
  3. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2012. Cancer incidence projections: Australia, 2011 to 2020. Cancer Series no. 66. Cat. No. CAN 62. Canberra: AIHW.
  4. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare & Australasian Association of Cancer Registries 2012. Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2012. Cancer series no. 74. Cat. no. CAN 70. Canberra: AIHW.
  5. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2012. Cancer survival and prevalence in Australia: period estimates from 1982 to 2010. Cancer Series no. 69. Cat. no. CAN 65. Canberra: AIHW.